Anti-Poaching Program Goes National in Kyrgyzstan

Government agencies, INTERPOL, and NGOs join forces with rangers and community members to confront illegal hunting of endangered species.

Press release. Bishkek / Seattle, 3/3/2015.

Less than a year after launching a pilot program to fight poaching of endangered snow leopards and their prey in Kyrgyzstan, the Snow Leopard Trust and its partners are ‘going national’ to cover all 19 of the country’s state parks and nature reserves – thanks to a grant from the UK government’s Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund.

The project, known as the Citizen-Ranger Wildlife Protection Program (CRWPP), trains, publicly honors, and financially rewards park rangers and local community members who successfully apprehend illegal hunters.

KG web 5
a wild snow leopard in Sarychat-Ertash Nature reserve, one of the country’s 19 protected areas and the site of the program pilot

It addresses one of the most persistent threats to snow leopards and their prey species in the Central Asian countries: poaching by outsiders.

The Snow Leopard Trust has been working in Kyrgyzstan since 2002 with a dominant focus on community-based conservation, and more recently, with the Kyrgyz President for catalyzing range-wide governmental action for snow leopard conservation.

The organization’s longest-running program in Kyrgyzstan, Snow Leopard Enterprises, has helped address the problem of hunting of snow leopards and wild ungulates by local community members. However, for many years, community members and rangers have expressed frustration at preventing poaching by outsiders.

“Our existing community-based conservation programs are not as effective against this outside threat,” says Brad Rutherford, Executive Director of the Snow Leopard Trust.

A Porous System Exploited by Illegal Hunters

Due to entrenched problems such as an under-resourced and underfunded wildlife conservation sector, lack of trained personnel and equipment, and low salaries for park staff, rangers and local people often feel socially and economically disenfranchised to control poaching in and around protected areas. In the past, this has supported a porous system easily exploited by illegal hunters.

In response, the Snow Leopard Trust, local NGO partner Snow Leopard Foundation in Kyrgyzstan (SLFK), and the Government of Kyrgyzstan developed CRWPP.

a snow leopard marks its territory in Sarychat-Ertash Nature Reserve
a snow leopard marks its territory in Sarychat-Ertash Nature Reserve

When cases of illegal hunting are recorded and filed by citizens, rangers, or teams of community members and rangers, CRWPP honors them in a public ceremony with certificates and a small cash reward.

CRWPP cash rewards provide incentive to rangers to apprehend poachers and follow-through filing cases. National recognition raises social profile and respect for rangers while publicly celebrating and positively reinforcing community collaboration and best practices.

Kuban Jumabai uulu and Sabir Atjadinov, the Director of the Forestry Agency of the Kyrgyz Republic, hand over the first-ever ranger award
Kuban Jumabai uulu and Sabir Atjadinov, the Director of the Forestry Agency of the Kyrgyz Republic, hand over the first-ever ranger award to Toktosun uulu Urmat

“Although it involves a cash reward, recognizing the rangers’ and community members’ effort is an even more important aspect of the program,” says Whitley Award winner Dr. Charudutt Mishra, Science and Conservation Director for the Snow Leopard Trust.

Arrests and filling cause hassles and costs for poachers as an added deterrent, and placing cases on record is a critical first step towards stronger law enforcement.

In 2014, the Snow Leopard Trust signed a 10-year, three-way agreement with SLFK, and the Government of Kyrgyzstan to help manage this program into the future, and later that same year, inaugural awards were conferred on a ranger-community member team that had apprehended a hunter with a gun in Sarychat-Ertash Nature Reserve .

Major Expansion Thanks to UK Grant

Now, a new grant received in 2015 from the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund through the UK Government will enable us to begin massive nationwide expansion starting this spring. The grant will help provide for an endowment to support the program’s financial awards into the future, including a roughly $250 US reward for cases involving endangered species.

 “Park rangers are working hard under difficult circumstances to protect endangered wildlife in Kyrgyzstan. I’m very pleased that we’ll now be able to assist and empower them in their efforts across all 19 Protected Areas of the country”, says Kubanych Jumabai uulu, director of the Snow Leopard Foundation Kyrgyzstan.

Britain’s Animal Welfare Minister Lord de Mauley says:

“Poaching threatens the very existence of globally endangered species like snow leopards and damages the communities in which it takes place.

“Through this fund we are working with Kyrgyzstan to stamp it out by building up a national network of state rangers and supporting local communities to fight against the trade. This approach has already shown itself to be successful at reducing poaching in and around protected areas.

One of the most exciting outcomes of the grant will be to enable a partnership with INTERPOL, the international police organization, to deliver quality training for rangers in law enforcement and investigative techniques.

The snow leopard's preferred prey species, ibex (pictured) and argali sheep, are threatened by illegal hunting as well.
The snow leopard’s preferred prey species, ibex (pictured) and argali sheep, are threatened by illegal hunting as well.

“Despite their limited resources, park rangers in protected areas as well as our partner communities work hard to stop these outside poachers – but their efforts too often go unrecognized,” says Dr. Mishra. ‘This project therefore will be a huge enabler. We’re excited to grow this program and start a new chapter in conservation in Kyrgyzstan.

More information

Snow Leopard Foundation in Kyrgyzstan

Leading the fight for the future of the endangered snow leopard in Kyrgyzstan, the Snow Leopard Foundation partners with international organizations such as the Snow Leopard Trust to better understand and protect this cat in this key range country.

Snow Leopard Trust

The Snow Leopard Trust, based in Seattle, WA, is a world leader in conservation of the endangered snow leopard, conducting pioneering research and partnering with communities as well as authorities in snow leopard habitat to protect the cat.

The Snow Leopard Trust’s work in Kyrgyzstan is in collaboration with Woodland Park Zoo, Seattle, with special support from Partnership Funding by Fondation Segré, managed by the Whitley Fund for Nature.
www.snowleopard.org

Photos

Photos of wild snow leopards and prey species in Kyrgyzstan are available for download: Set 1 / Set 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8 Comments

  1. There will be no animals left if we don’t stop the wanton slaughter of the wildlife thru ought the world. It is time to punish those who would ruin our planets wild life.

  2. Pingback: FIFA 17 POINTS

Leave a Reply