Understanding Snow Leopard Home Ranges

Snow Leopard Trust researcher Örjan Johansson recently published a groundbreaking study where he could show that most Protected Areas in the cats’ habitat are too small to hold viable snow leopard populations. In this article, he explains how he and his team calculated snow leopard home ranges using data from cats they tracked with GPS collars.

Aztai and Khashaa Get New Collars!

Orjan returned to our Mongolian research base camp in early October, and he has already accomplished some incredible things. With the help of Kullu from our India program, Aztai was fitted with a replacement collar on October 15th. The new collar has been reprogrammed to send updates on Aztai’s locations more frequently, giving us the …

A Snow Leopard Takes Over

In early April, Snow Leopard Trust field researcher confirmed that Tsagaan, one of the snow leopards in our long term ecological study had passed away due to natural causes. Aztai, a rival male living adjacent to Tsagaan’s previous home range, has been seen exploring the territory that had previously belonged to Tsagaan at the complete …

Snow doesn't stop snow leopard research

Dear blog readers, thanks for a great year. Here is an end-of-the-year update about our long-term  snow leopard study in the South Gobi, Mongolia. November marked one of the coldest months in South Gobi with mercury dipping to abysmal limits. Field work became increasingly difficult and our camp remained under thick cover of snow. Despite …

Follow the Cats Update: Zaraa Enters the Badlands

(Map Courtesy of SLT/Panthera) We are happy to announce that the collars worn by Aztai, Khavar and Zaraa continue to work fabulously, uploading up to 80% of the scheduled locations; those of Shonkhor, Tsagaan, Saikhan and Devekh seem to be under-performing. The good news is that Orjan will be returning to the field shortly (he …