Dagina: Snow Leopard and Scientific Pioneer

She was first photographed by camera traps when she was still a cub, wore GPS tracking collars on two separate occasions and has successfully raised at least two litters of cubs: Dagina may be the world’s most comprehensibly studied wild snow leopard. At nine years old, she is still going strong, and contributing to cutting-edge science.

Mates or Munchies – What Drives Big Cats’ Spatial Behavior?

Most big cats are territorial, with males commonly using larger home ranges than females. But what is driving the spatial behavior of these cats? A new study published in the journal Ecosphere compares spatial data from snow leopards and pumas to better understand what is governing their territorial behavior. Two factors stand out: abundance of prey and access to potential mates. However, the way they work together is not what researchers expected.

Pioneering Research Leads to PhD

Örjan Johansson’s groundbreaking work on the snow leopard’s biology and behavior has led to novel insights into the spatial needs, predation patterns, and reproduction cycle of this elusive cat. Now, after 8 years of field work, collaring 23 individual snow leopards and spending more than 1,000 nights in the Gobi Desert, this pioneering scientist has received his PhD from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.

Back in the Shadows: Collared Snow Leopard Tsetsen Goes Offline

Tsetsen, a male snow leopard wearing a GSP collar in Mongolia’s Tost Mountains as part of the Snow Leopard Trust’s long-term study of these cats, has gone offline as scheduled. The batteries on Tsetsen’s collar appear to have run out. The collar itself will drop off the cat in the next weeks.